Approval To Fly Tug Aircraft     Licences and Membership     Pilot Recency Requirements     Sailplane Towing Rating

Approval to fly Tug Aircraft

Initial approval to train as a tug pilot will be issued by the Chief Tug Pilot (CTP), after discussion with the CFI and Deputy Chief Tug Pilot (DCTP). Approval to fly tug aircraft will be issued after successful completion of a tug pilot training course. See ‘Pilot Details’ for current list of tug pilots. NB: A password is required to view this page.

Each pilot will be checked annually and their approval reviewed. The flying check will be done by the Chief Tug Pilot, DCTP or a Check Pilot.

Specific authorisation and in some cases differences training will be required for the following:

  1. Any flight away from Dunstable.
  2. Retrieves from fields.
  3. Retrieves from airfields
  4. Dual aero-tows
  5. Aero-towing with the Super Cub
  6. Aero-towing with any other aircraft that maybe used by the London Gliding Club.

These authorisations will be issued by the CTP.

To remain current as a tug pilot, you must comply with the recency requirements listed below.

If currency lapses for any reason, a flight with the CTP or a Check Pilot will be required.

An approved tug pilot may not fly if their medical or licence has lapsed. The onus for keeping medicals current rests with the pilot. On renewal, a photo of the new medical should be emailed to the CTP, this can be done using the ‘Medical’ form. A database of pilot’s current licence and current medical certificate is kept securely and a summary of expiry dates is available to view on the ‘Pilot Details’ page.


Licences and Membership

Each tug pilot must be a full flying member of the London Gliding Club.

Each tug pilot must hold a valid Pilots Licence. This must include the following:

For EASA PPL, CPL or ATPL

  1. A valid EASA Class 1 or 2 medical certificate.
  2. A Sailplane Towing Rating.
  3. A PPL issued within the last 12 months OR a valid Certificate of Revalidation for SEP(Land) on the EASA licence. The Certificate of Revalidation is valid for 24 months, the expiry date must be specified on the pilot’s licence.

A CAA Examiner or Class Rating Instructor (CRI) may sign the certificate once they are satisfied that 12 hours PIC have been completed on any SEP aircraft during the preceding 12 months AND the pilot has completed at least 1 hours flying with a CRI in the preceding 12 months. The flight is essentially a general handling and aero-tow refresher and should be recorded in the Pilot’s Logbook. These EASA Licence Revalidations must be submitted to the CAA using form SRG1119E.

For LAPL

  1. A valid medical declaration or EASA Class 1 or 2 medical certificate.
  2. A Sailplane Towing Rating.
  3. A PPL issued within the last 12 months OR a valid Certificate of Revalidation for SEP(Land) on the EASA licence. The Certificate of Revalidation is valid for 24 months, the expiry date must be specified on the pilot’s licence.

A CAA Examiner or Class Rating Instructor (CRI) may sign the certificate once they are satisfied that 12 hours PIC have been completed on any SEP aircraft during the preceding 12 months AND the pilot has completed at least 1 hours flying with a CRI in the preceding 12 months. The flight is essentially a general handling and aero-tow refresher and should be recorded in the Pilot’s Logbook. The CAA does not record LAPL Revalidations.

For NPPL

  1. A valid medical declaration or EASA Class 1 or 2 medical certificate.
  2. Approval to tow at LGC.
  3. A NPPL issued in the last 12 months OR within the expiry date shown on the ‘Pilot Details’ page of this website. The requirements for revalidation are the same as for an EASA licence, except they are not recorded by the CAA.

A CAA Examiner or Class Rating Instructor (CRI) may sign the certificate once they are satisfied that 12 hours PIC have been completed on any SEP aircraft during the preceding 12 months AND the pilot has completed at least 1 hours flying with a CRI in the preceding 12 months. The flight is essentially a general handling and aero-tow refresher and should be recorded in the Pilot’s Logbook. The onus is with the pilot to remain current. To do this within LGC, after completing a flight refresher, this should be recorded on the “Pilot Details” page and the validity will then be extended for a further 24 months.

Completion of any Licence Skill Test (LST) in the preceding 12 months can be substituted for the 1 hour flight refresher at the discretion of the CRI.

See ‘Pilot Details’ for current information.


Pilot Recency Requirements

To maintain your approval as a tug pilot you will need to maintain recency. You should;

  1. Complete at least one aero-tow within the preceding three months.
  2. Complete a minimum of 12 hours tugging or 75 aero-tows in each calendar year.
  3. Complete a refresher flight with the CTP, DCTP or Check Pilot in each calendar year.
  4. Remain current on each type for which you are qualified. This can be done by completing at least one aero-tow on each type within three months of the previous flight on type.
  5. Keep abreast of updates and changes to procedures. These will be promulgated on this website and occasionally by direct email. Short term changes may be shown in the tug or on the tug status board. Additions or changes will be alerted to you by a message to your email.

The Robin DR300 and DR400 are sufficiently similar that they can be considered one type. Currently we have only one type in service.


Sailplane Towing Rating

If you hold an EASA licence, you will need to have a Sailplane Towing Rating endorsed on your licence. This can be done soon after completing your tug pilot training by application to the CAA. The CTP will steer you through this process.


Return to ‘Pilots’             Return to ‘Front Page’

 

slice7